5 Ways To Sweat-Proof Your Make-Up Routine

It's one hot, hot summer. Mercury is rising to record levels and while this means frosé, beach dips and balmy nights are on the cards, it also means our normal beauty routine needs tweaking... From melting makeup to the perils of perspiration, it's a whole new beauty ballgame when we're hit with a heat wave. Here are the tips for keeping your makeup fresh through this seasonal scorcher. 

Beauticate loves this image of Li Wei by Ma Gang

Beauticate loves this image of Li Wei by Ma Gang


1. Wait until your face is cool to start your makeup

Putting makeup on warm, damp skin is immediately setting up for failure – product will slide right off before it has had a chance to set and, so, stay. Instead, give your skin five to ten minutes to cool and dry. If you don’t have that kind of time, pop your hairdryer onto the ‘cool’ setting and give your face a quick blast of air (this is also good to do as soon as you put on your moisturiser and foundation if using liquid – they will set faster). By starting your routine with cool and dry skin, you’ll give your make-up greater odds of staying put all day. 

To absorb shine and combat sweat, try Clinique Stay Matte Oil-Free Makeup, $50

 

2. Use a serum instead of a moisturiser

In general, a moisturiser won’t replace a serum (moisturisers hydrate more deeply than serums), but on a hot, muggy day, when you won’t need as deep a moisture hit, a serum is an appropriate choice. The formulation is lighter than a creamy moisturiser and provides a drier base for your make-up, which is exactly what you’ll want when your skin is clammy and sweaty. 

If you do have very dry skin and the thought of not using moisturiser is a cutis cardinal sin, the added antioxidants in Grown Alchemist Facial Serum, $60 will ensure your skin isn't missing out on any hydrating benefits delivered by your creams. 

 

3. Use an oil-free primer 

Primers, we know, help our makeup stay on as long as possible, including in humid conditions. But, the difference is ensuring it's an oil-free variety, like NARS Pro-Prime Pore-Refining Primer. Apply as normal: put primer on before your base, and after your serum - just be sure that the primer has set before you add foundation, and let your serum do the same. This ensures that your layers aren't going to melt into each (or worse, visibly separate on your skin) and slide off. And don't forget to prime the more isolated makeup areas: an eyelid primer like MAC Prep+Prime 24 Hour Extend Eye Base will ensure your shadow will last you from sunny day soirees to balmy night dates. 

 

4.  Steer clear of dark shades

Summer is the perfect time to keep your makeup looking natural, especially during the day. Dark colours, particularly on your lids and around the eye are prone to smudging and shifting when too much moisture hits. This causes more of a I-went-out-and-slept-in-this-make-up than I-woke-up-like-this kind of look. Nope. Luckily, golden peachy and pink shades are taking over the red carpet (read: Emily Ratajkowski’s look at the Golden Globes). Peach pallets suit most skin tones (just be picky where you apply: darker skin tones, take the trend to the lip and lighter skin tones opt for an eyeshadow. But, don't be afraid to play around with what works for you). Be sure to blend in to keep the look pretty and naturally, keeping you a fresh faced. We love the Too Faced Sweet Peach Eyeshadow Palette, launching today at Mecca.  

 

5. Cut the cake  

When dealing with the heat and the subsequent moisture in the air, it can help to swap your powders for creams in order to avoid a cakey finish. Use a liquid foundation like MAC Studio Face and Body Foundation, $50 and try a cream eyeliners like Bobbi Brown Long-Wear Gel Eyeliner to keep a fresh look all day. Add highlighter to cheek bones to keep focus on the shimmer in a flattering spot, and take the spotlight from any other unfavourable oily areas. Fitting nicely with a dewy, natural look, swap your lipstick for a gloss during the day, so your lips can also avoid any unwanted cakiness. 

 
Story by Samantha Blanchfield