Do DIY Cellulite Treatments Actually Work?

Remember the red, circular suction marks on the backs of celebs like Gwyneth Paltrow and Lena Dunham a few years back? The process of cupping is one that dates back as far as Ancient Egypt, and is an alternative therapy used for anything from inflammation and muscle pain to general wellbeing. But lately we've seen a new kind of cupping flooding our social pages: cellulite cups. Along with fascia massagers like The Fasciablaster, these are the latest DIY massage treatments for cellulite - and while it's completely normal (albeit pesky), we can't think of any woman who wouldn't like to try and banish or at least reduce the appearance of it. 

 Image: Instagram @xeniadeli

Image: Instagram @xeniadeli


The battle of the bulge

While there's nothing wrong with or bad about cellulite, it is an indicator of poor circulation.
You can't actually get rid of cellulite by doing one thing, once. Think of cellulite as little
marshmallow-y cushions under your skin that need constant massaging to get the blood flowing, the effect being a less bumpy appearance.

We're promised that certain foods, vitamins and drinks will all help to get rid of that unforgiving dimpling on our thighs, arms, derrieres, and everywhere in between. There are thousands of products and procedures in the beauty world targeted at diminishing the appearance of cellulite - oils, creams, scrubs, massages and more. We’re even told that certain exercises are going to get rid of cellulite, as if after a few persistent lunges it will vanish without a trace (if only). The reality is that cellulite has a lot to do with genetics, blood circulation and hormones, but there are ways to placate the telltale signs that show up on the surface of the skin. Lotions, oils and creams containing caffeine and other firming ingredients can help lessen the appearnace of cellulite by improving the condition of the skin, but it's unlikely they can change the structure of the cushions under the skin. 

 

CAN YOU MASSAGE IT AWAY?

At-home cupping is a non-invasive, deep-tissue therapy that you can perform on yourself by applying medical grade silicone cups. Firstly, start with a body scrub to prep the area - either a cellulite-specific scrub or a general body scrub will do. Next, apply some body oil that will help lubricate the area you will be cupping. Finally, place the cup/s around your problem areas and either move it around in a circular massage motion or leave several on for around ten minutes before releasing. The cups are easy to apply - just press them onto your skin and squeeze lightly to create a suction affect. This promotes blood circulation and efficiently helps to drain lymph nodes and eliminate toxins from the body. 

The result? An overall reduction of fluid build-up and less dimply looking skin. Ultimately, you’re detoxifying your body and allowing your skin to rejuvenate and tighten itself for a healthier appearance. It's even said to help in the reduction of stretch marks and minor scarring and aid in weight loss. While there are no guarantees, combined with  a healthy diet and plenty of exercise, we think this new treatment is definitely one worth trying. 

Another method that's gaining a lot of popularity in the health world now is to massage your fascia (the thin layer of tissue that covers all of your muscles) with either a foam roller (see Goops guide here) or a funny looking tool like the FasciaBlaster. We are waiting for ours to arrive to give it a proper review, but the concept that fascia adhesions can cause pain, tension and reduce the flow of fluids around the body is founded. Anything that increases circulation can help shift cellulite. 

What are your experiences with creams, lotions, oil and self massage for cellulite? We'd love to hear from you.

 
Story by Claudia De Berardinis